16 Best Camping Spots in Redwood National Park (and nearby)


Redwood National Park is one of the most beautiful places to camp in California, with some of the tallest trees and oldest-growth redwoods. But where is the best camping in Redwood National Park?

From picnicking at visitor centers to camping under starry skies at Elk Prairie Campground, Redwood National Park offers something for everyone looking for a unique outdoor experience!

If you’re ready to explore this incredible park while enjoying the best camping in a redwood forest, keep reading – we’ll cover everything from must-see attractions like Jedediah Smith Campground and Gold Bluffs Beach Campground all the way up to tips on how to find old-growth redwoods.

So grab your tent or RV and get ready for an unforgettable adventure!

Here are my top 19 picks for the best campgrounds near Redwood National Park. Then further down, I’ll answer all the top frequently asked questions.

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1. Elk Prairie Campground

Located inside Prarie Creek Redwoods State Park off of Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway. Max trailer length is 24′ and max motorhome length is 27′. Dry campground: meaning no electricity, water, or sewage connections for RVs.

Less than 1 mile from Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

$35/night

Contact:

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=415


2. Mill Creek Campground

Located inside Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park. Max trailer length is 24′ and max motorhome length is 28′. Dry campground: meaning no electricity, water, or sewage connections for RVs. But there is a dump station.

1 mile to Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

$35/night

Contact:

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=414


3. Jedediah Smith Campground

Located inside Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park. Max trailer length is 21′ and max motorhome length is 25′. Dry campground: meaning no electricity, water, or sewage connections for RVs.

Less than 1 mile to Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

$35/night

Contact:

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=413


4. Gold Bluffs Beach Campground

Located inside Prarie Creek Redwoods State Park off of Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway. No trailers are allowed and the max motorhome length is 24′. Dry campground: meaning no electricity, water, or sewage connections for RVs.

Less than 1 mile from Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

$35/night

Contact:

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=415


5. Agate Campground

Located inside Sue-meg State Park (formerly Patrick’s Point State Park). There are 3 campgrounds here although one (Penn Campground) is tent only.

A lush forest on the edge of the Pacific ocean, this campground is only 15 miles from Redwood National Park. Dry campground: meaning no electricity, water, or sewage connections for RVs.

Pricing:

$35/night

Contact:

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=417


6. Abalone Campground

Located inside Sue-meg State Park (formerly Patrick’s Point State Park). There are 3 campgrounds here although one (Penn Campground) is tent only.

A lush forest on the edge of the Pacific ocean, this campground is only 15 miles from Redwood National Park. Dry campground: meaning no electricity, water, or sewage connections for RVs.

Pricing:

$35/night

Contact:

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=417


7. Emerald Forest Cabins & RV

A great privately-owned campground with cabins, tent sites, and RV sites. Free Wi-Fi, multiple bathhouses with hot showers, fire pits, and picnic tables at every site.

19 miles from Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

$38 for tents. RVs start at $44 up to $52. Back-in and pull-thru sites are available. Full hookups. 30 amp service only.

Contact:

https://www.emeraldforestcabins.com/


8. Big Lagoon County Park

A campground inside and operated by Humbolt County. Day-use area with beach and lagoon access. Kayaks for rent also. Adjacent to Humboldt Lagoons State Park.

13 miles to Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

$5.00 entrance fee and $25 camping fee; first-come, first-served.

Contact:

https://humboldtgov.org/Facilities/Facility/Details/Big-Lagoon-2


9. Sylvan Harbor Campground

Select sites can accommodate RVs up to 40′ in length. 70 RV sites with full hook-ups and 7 tent sites. Appears to be 110v electrical service only.

19 miles to Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

$36.10/night

Contact:

https://campnative.com/campgrounds/usa/ca/trinidad/sylvan-harbor


10. Crescent City / Redwoods KOA Holiday

Full-hookup, 30/50-amp big-rig friendly sites with expanded cable and free Wi-Fi. Close to some great hiking trails in the Redwood National and State Parks as well as many beautiful beaches and four major rivers.

9 miles to Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

$47.50-$67.50/night depending on 30/20 Amps or 50/30 Amps and length of RV.

Contact:

https://koa.com/campgrounds/crescent-city/reserve/?errorCode=directaccess


11. Mystic Forest RV Park

30 Complete RV hookups: 16 Pull Throughs, Water, Sewer, 30 amp electrical, Cable TV. Miniature golf, Clean Restrooms, Hot Showers, Laundry, and Acres of Hiking.

9 miles to Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

$48.00 for 2 people and $4.00 each for anyone 5 years old and older.

Contact:

https://www.mysticforestrv.com/


12. The Ramblin’ Redwoods

Tucked under the towering redwoods and surrounded by native undergrowth, their sites are private and quiet. Each site can accommodate up to 8 guests and comes with private campfire rings and parking for 2 vehicles. Choose from Standard Back-in, Pull-thru, and Full Hookup sites with 30/50 amp, sewer, and water.

9 miles to Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

$47-$76/night

Contact:

https://ramblinredwoodsrv.com/accommodations/


13. Klamath River Rv Park

Located right on the Klamath river. Playground, weekend cafe, laundry, and hot showers. Mostly 30 amp, but some 50 amp. Adjacent to the California National Redwoods State parks with nearby beautiful ocean beaches and hiking & biking trails.

5 miles to Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

Tent sites from $35.68. RV sites from $56.10-65.95/night depending on river or mountain view.

Contact:

https://klamathriverrvpark.com/


14. Kamp Klamath RV Park & Campground

The closest campground (1.3 miles of paved road) to the mouth of the Klamath River. The Klamath Beach sand bar creates and protects an important estuary. All RV sites have full hookups, 30 or 50 AMP, free TV & WiFi.

6 miles to Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

Tent sites from $35 and RV sites from $48/night depending on river or mountain view.

Contact:

https://www.kampklamath.com/


15. Flint Ridge Backcountry Camp

For the most part, I’ve focused on RV parks, but I did want to feature backcountry campsites due to the breathtaking views available in the Redwood forest. Within 1/4-mile of the scenic Coastal Drive, Flint Ridge Backcountry Camp is on a wooded ridgeline near the Pacific Ocean. Nearby trails lead to old-growth coast redwood forest, a historic WW2 Radar Station, and high coastal bluffs.

Located inside Redwood National and State Parks.

Pricing:

Free with required free backcountry permit

Contact:

https://www.nps.gov/places/flintridgebackcountrycamp.htm


16. Klamath Camper Corral

Klamath jet boat tours, drive-thru trees, and miles of redwood hiking trails are just a few of the nearby amenities.

5 miles to Redwood National Park.

Pricing:

Tent sites from $37.50 and RV sites from $48-58/night depending on 30 amp or 50 amp and length of RV.

Contact:

https://klamathcampercorral.com/

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Table of Contents:

Redwood National Park Overview

Redwood National Park is located in northern California, along the coast of the Pacific Ocean.

It covers an area of 131,983 acres and is home to some of the tallest trees on Earth. The park was established in 1968 to protect old-growth redwoods from logging and other human activities.

Location and Size:

Redwood National Park is located in northern California, along the coast of the Pacific Ocean. It covers an area of 131,983 acres and includes four parks:

  • Redwood National Park
  • Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park
  • Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park
  • Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park

History of the Park:

In 1968 Congress passed a bill establishing Redwood National Park to protect old-growth redwoods from logging and other human activities that threatened their existence.

Since then it has become one of America’s most beloved national parks with visitors coming from all over to experience its beauty firsthand.

Wildlife and Ecosystems:

The park’s ecosystems are incredibly diverse with coastal prairies filled with wildflowers as well as lush forests full of ancient redwood trees towering up to 300 feet tall!

Wildlife abounds here too including elk herds which can be seen grazing near Elk Prairie Campground or at Gold Bluffs Beach Campground during certain times throughout the year.

Other animals such as black bears, river otters, gray whales, bald eagles also call this place home making it a great spot for wildlife viewing!

Camping in Redwood National Park is a great way to experience the beauty of these majestic giants. Jedediah Smith Campground offers picnic tables for day use as well as RV sites with hookups for those looking for more amenities while camping.

Before heading out, make sure you stop by the Visitors Center where staff can help plan your trip.

Redwood National Park is an incredible destination for camping, offering visitors a unique opportunity to explore its diverse ecosystems and wildlife. With that in mind, let’s take a closer look at the best camping spots within the park.

Key Takeaway: Redwood National Park is an amazing place to experience the beauty of old-growth redwoods. Camping here offers a unique opportunity to get up close and personal with these majestic giants. Visitors can explore the park’s diverse ecosystems, spot wildlife such as elk herds or black bears, and take in stunning views from Gold Bluffs Beach Campground. Jedediah Smith Campground provides picnic tables for day use and RV sites with hookups for those looking for more amenities while camping. Make sure you stop by the Visitor Center before heading out to plan your trip!

Camping in Redwood National Park

Redwood National Park is a great destination for campers of all types. Whether you’re looking to pitch a tent, rent an RV, or go backcountry camping, there are plenty of options available in the park.

Types of Campsites Available:

Redwood National Park offers several different types of campsites for visitors to choose from. RV camping is allowed at many campgrounds within the park and there are also sites available for tent camping as well as group and backcountry camping.

All campsites come with picnic tables and fire rings so that visitors can enjoy their time outdoors while staying safe and comfortable.

Popular Campgrounds:

There are four main campgrounds located within Redwood National Park – Elk Prairie Campground, Jedediah Smith Campground, Gold Bluffs Beach Campground, and Mill Creek Horse Camp. Each one has its own unique features but all offer stunning views of the surrounding redwoods forests as well as easy access to trails leading into the wilderness areas nearby.

When planning your trip to Redwood National Park, it is important to be aware of any rules or regulations that may apply during your stay.

These include things such as quiet hours (10pm-6am), no open fires outside designated fire rings/grills, no cutting down trees or collecting plants/flowers without permission from park rangers first, and proper disposal of trash in bear-proof containers only.

It is always best practice to familiarize yourself with these guidelines before heading out on your trip so that everyone can stay safe while enjoying their time in nature.

Camping in Redwood National Park offers a unique and breathtaking experience that will leave you with memories to last a lifetime.

Now let’s explore the best campgrounds available for your next trip!

Key Takeaway: Redwood National Park is an excellent destination for campers of all types, offering a variety of campsites including RV camping, tent camping, group and backcountry camping. Popular campgrounds include Elk Prairie Campground, Jedediah Smith Campground, Gold Bluffs Beach Campground and Mill Creek Horse Camp. All visitors should be aware of park regulations such as quiet hours (10pm-6am), no open fires outside designated fire ringsgrills and proper disposal of trash in bear-proof containers only.

Things to Do in Redwood National Park

Hiking Trails: Redwood National Park offers some of the most spectacular hiking trails in California. With over 200 miles of trails, you can explore the old-growth redwoods, enjoy stunning views from high ridges and meander along creekside paths.

The Tall Trees Trail is a popular route for visitors looking to experience the park’s tallest trees.

This 3-mile loop trail takes hikers through an ancient forest with towering redwoods that reach up to 300 feet tall!

Other great hikes include the Prairie Creek Trail, which follows alongside a creek and passes by several waterfalls; and the James Irvine Trail, which leads to Fern Canyon – one of Redwood National Park’s most iconic spots.

Visitor Centers and Museums: If you want to learn more about Redwood National Park before or after your visit, there are several visitor centers located throughout the park where you can get information on local attractions as well as maps and guides for exploring this beautiful area.

In addition to these visitor centers, there are also two museums in Redwood National Park – Kuchel Visitor Center near Orick has exhibits about coastal wildlife; while Hiouchi Visitor Center near Crescent City features displays on Native American culture.

Hiking is one of the main activities at Redwood National Park, but there are plenty of other ways to enjoy this majestic place.

Kayaking along rivers like Smith River or Mill Creek can be a great way to explore the area; fishing enthusiasts will find many opportunities in streams throughout the park. Birdwatchers may spot bald eagles or marbled murrelets, while beachcombers can search for agates among drift logs washed ashore at Gold Bluffs Beach Campground.

There is something for everyone here!

From exploring the majestic redwood trees to discovering hidden coves, Redwood National Park offers an array of activities for RVers and campers alike. Now let’s look at where you can stay while camping in this incredible park!

Key Takeaway: Redwood National Park offers a wealth of activities for visitors to enjoy. From hiking trails with stunning views and ancient redwoods, to kayaking, fishing, birdwatching and beachcombing – there is something for everyone here! Visitors can also explore the park’s history at two museums located in the area. Highlights include: • Tall Trees Trail – 3-mile loop through an ancient forest with towering redwoods • Prairie Creek Trail – follows alongside a creek and passes by several waterfalls • James Irvine Trail – leads to Fern Canyon • Kuchel Visitor Center – exhibits about coastal wildlife • Hiouchi Visitor Center– displays on Native American culture • Kayaking along rivers like Smith River or Mill Creek • Fishing opportunities in streams throughout the park • Birdwatching for bald eagles or marbled murrelets

Best Places to See Old-Growth Redwoods

Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park is one of the best places to see old-growth redwoods in Redwood National Park.

It’s home to some of the tallest trees in the world, including a few that are over 300 feet tall! The park has several trails and picnic tables, making it an ideal spot for a family outing or romantic walk. There’s also a visitor center with exhibits about the park’s history and ecology.

Jedediah Smith Campground is another great place to see old-growth redwoods in Redwood National Park. This campground offers plenty of opportunities for camping under the stars among these majestic giants. You can also explore nearby trails and take advantage of amenities like fire pits, picnic tables, restrooms, and showers.

Gold Bluffs Beach Campground is located near Fern Canyon on California’s northern coast and provides stunning views of both ocean waves crashing against cliffs as well as towering old-growth redwoods along its beachfront trail system.

This campground features more than 50 campsites equipped with fire rings, picnic tables, bathrooms, showers and other amenities perfect for families looking to enjoy nature at its finest while camping beneath ancient redwood trees.

Visiting any one, or all, of these locations will provide you with an unforgettable experience that you won’t soon forget. It is important to plan ahead before visiting by checking out when each location is open so as not to miss out on seeing these incredible natural wonders up close.

Visiting Redwood National Park is an amazing experience that you won’t soon forget. With the right preparation and planning, your trip can be filled with awe-inspiring views of old-growth redwoods and plenty of outdoor activities to enjoy.

Now let’s look at some tips for planning your trip to Redwood National Park.

FAQs in Relation to Best Camping in Redwood National Park

Can you camp anywhere in Redwood National Forest?

Yes, you can camp in Redwood National Forest.

The park offers a variety of camping options for both RV owners and renters. There are several developed campgrounds with amenities such as restrooms, showers, picnic tables, and fire rings. Backcountry camping is also allowed in some areas of the forest with a valid permit.

When camping in the backcountry, visitors must follow Leave No Trace principles to help protect the environment and ensure that future generations can enjoy this beautiful area too!

Where can you camp when visiting Redwood National Park?

Redwood National Park offers a variety of camping options for visitors.

RV owners can stay at the Jedediah Smith Campground, which is located near Crescent City and has full hookups available. For those looking to rent an RV, there are several nearby rental companies that offer delivery services to the park.

Families who love to camp can choose from three different family campsites in the park: Elk Prairie, Gold Bluffs Beach, and Mill Creek. All sites have picnic tables and fire rings with grills provided; some also include flush toilets or showers.

Full-time RV living is possible at Redwood National Park as well; however, due to limited space availability, it’s best to make reservations ahead of time if planning on staying longer than 14 days in one location.

Camping with kids is easy too! The park offers many activities for children such as ranger-led programs and nature walks that will help them learn about their surroundings while having fun outdoors!

Where can you camp for free in Redwood National Park?

Redwood National Park offers several free camping opportunities.

The Jedediah Smith Campground is a great option for those looking to camp without spending money. This primitive campsite has no running water or electricity, but it does offer access to the nearby Smith River and plenty of hiking trails.

Another option is the Mill Creek Campground, which also provides access to the river and miles of trails in addition to having potable water available at each site.

Finally, there are numerous dispersed camping areas throughout Redwood National Park that provide an even more rustic experience with no amenities whatsoever. Whichever you choose, you’ll be sure to have a memorable experience surrounded by majestic redwoods!

Ep. 53: Redwood National Park | California RV travel camping

Conclusion

With its majestic old-growth redwoods, picnic tables, visitor center, and Elk Prairie Campground to Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park and Gold Bluffs Beach Campground, there’s something for everyone here.

While the summer months are arguably the best time to go, many of the campgrounds I featured are open year-round.

Whether you’re looking for the tallest trees, a scenic drive, or you just want to relax in nature, Redwood National Park has it all! So if you’re searching for the best camping in Redwood National Park experience then look no further than this incredible park!

Are you looking for the best camping experience in Redwood National Park?

Whether you’re a family of RV travelers, full-time RVers, or just want to camp with your kids, we have all the information and tips that will help make your stay comfortable and enjoyable.

Check out our blog posts on different camping spots throughout the park so you can find one that suits your needs! We’ll also give advice on packing essentials, safety guidelines while exploring nature trails, and more.

Get ready for an unforgettable adventure – let’s go camping in Redwood National Park!

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Image by David from Pixabay and Image by PublicDomainPictures from Pixabay and Image by Glenn Franco Simmons from Pixabay

Jeff Campbell

Jeff Campbell travels on and off with his 3 daughters in a Newmar Baystar Class A Motorhome. He writes extensively on both RVs, campgrounds, parenting on the road tips, remote learning & schooling, and much more!

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